In the Media

Detroit needs a plan to leave no one behind

Bankole Thompson, from The Detroit News, focuses on Detroit’s job opportunities, and highlights minority-owned firms in the city, using the 139 Square Miles report.

Detroit needs a plan to leave no one behind
By: Bankole Thompson
The Detroit News
August 30, 2017
LINK


Detroit entrepreneur Danielle D. North pulled no punches in her assessment of the recent Detroit Future City report that revealed glaring economic inequities in the city.

“We need programs, incentives and a sincere focus on existing business owners and those interested in starting new businesses in the neighborhoods,” said North, 35. “Small business owners such as myself work very hard to provide jobs to deserving workers and citizens in Detroit.”

The report indicated that Detroit has seen the largest increase in jobs that pay more than $40,000 annually. But those jobs are concentrated downtown and midtown and in the city’s core industrial areas leaving Detroit’s neighborhoods out of the economic boom.

And when it comes to entrepreneurs, the report said there are 160 black-owned companies per 1,000 African-American residents and 103 Hispanic-owned firms per 1,000 Hispanic residents. Both groups, according to the report, are only about half as likely to transition from self-employment to hiring others.

Click here to read the full article.

In the Media

Eleven surprising facts that define Detroit’s ‘139 Square Miles’

Nancy Derringer, from Bridge Magazine, highlights eleven facts about the city of Detroit found in Detroit Future City’s 139 Square Miles report.

Eleven surprising facts that define Detroit’s ‘139 Square Miles’
Bridge Magazine
By: Nancy Derringer
August 29, 2017
LINK


At first glance, “139 Square Miles,” a new book-length report by the strategic planning organization Detroit Future City, looks like a data lover’s dream, the story of Michigan’s largest city told in 75 pages of charts, graphs and tables. But to Anika Goss-Foster, executive director of Detroit Future City, read beginning to end, “139 Square Miles” tells a story about the city.

A story where the overall population is still in decline, but the number of white residents is growing. Where the graduation rate from local public schools is 78 percent, and educational attainment beyond high school is still disappointingly low. Where 672,795 souls live, 80 percent of them African American, 37,107 of them foreign-born. Where 57 percent of children live in poverty. Not exactly a novel, but with humanity in every number.

Particularly worrisome for Goss-Foster: Nearly a quarter of Metro Detroit households have incomes above $100,000, but only 6 percent of Detroit households do. Nearly half of Detroit households earn less than $25,000 per year, but only 25 percent of Metro households earn that little.

Click here to read the full article.

In the Media

Detroit’s economy is growing. But who’s getting the jobs?

Nancy Kaffer, from the Detroit Free Press, examines Detroit’s population and job opportunities, using data from Detroit Future City’s 139 Square Miles report.

Detroit’s economy is growing. But who’s getting the jobs?
By: Nancy Kaffer
Detroit Free Press
August 29, 2017
LINK


Detroit still struggles to define who its resurgence is for, or how the influx of new jobs and residents to downtown and Midtown effect longtime Detroiters.

Drive outside the 7.2 miles of downtown and Midtown, or outside the handful of stable and rebounding neighborhoods, and the trope of two Detroits – one booming, the other distressed and struggling — is undeniable.

Population and jobs numbers included in the most recent report from Detroit Future City, a nonprofit that’s developed a strategic framework for land use in the city, offer a stark look at how far Detroit has come, and how far we have yet to go.

Detroit’s jobs-to-population ratio has increased, from 25 jobs per 100 residents in 2010 to 30 jobs for every 100 residents now. That’s a promising improvement.

But there’s another revealing measure. Of the jobs in the city, 33% are held by African Americans. That’s down from 2010, when 36% of the jobs inside Detroit were held by African Americans. Because Detroit is 80% black, it’s fair, when looking at these metrics, to use race as a stand-in for residency.

Click here to read the full article.

In the Media

Detroit Future City delivers unsparing, clear-eyed look at the future

Keith Owens, from Michigan Chronicle, highlights how accessible and easily digestible Detroit Future City’s 139 Square Miles report is for all who are interested in understanding Detroit’s status, and he recommends the report as required reading.

Detroit Future City delivers unsparing, clear-eyed look at the future
Michigan Chronicle
By: Keith Owens
August 29 2017
LINK


The recently released report from Detroit Future City, 139 Square Miles, is relatively brief, unsparingly to the point, and should be required reading for anyone who claims to want to honestly understand where Detroit is right now. I mean, where Detroit really is. Not the feel good hype about Detroit being ‘back’, and not the defeatist rhetoric that nothing good is happening beyond downtown.

 Sometimes the truth hurts, but it also helps. Most importantly, the truth clarifies. And of all the things that Detroit Future City Executive Director Anika Goss Foster shared with me recently as she attempted to break down the report’s findings, the one observation that stood out to me above and beyond all others was this:

 “This is the big headline for me; that economic inclusion is not just rhetoric. And I think that that’s really, really clear. That African Americans who are the majority of the population of Detroit, we need to make much more of a concerted effort for all of us to be able to participate. And that if African Americans are not participating in employment and small business opportunities, and educational achievement? Then that should be everybody’s problem. Anybody who cares about Detroit should be frustrated about African Americans not achieving to their fullest potential in Detroit.” 

Click here to read the full article.

In the Media

Survey finds fewer families with children in Detroit

Candice Williams, from The Detroit News, focuses on statistics about Detroit’s families with children, and population and job growth, using data from Detroit Future City’s 139 Square Miles report.

Survey finds fewer families with children in Detroit
The Detroit News
By: Candice Williams
August 23, 2017
LINK


The city has seen the number of families with children decline by 43 percent since 2000 with only about a quarter of households with children, according to a report released this week from the nonprofit Detroit Future City, which also detailed a slowing population decline and job growth.

In a 77-page report, “139 Square Miles,” the average size of Detroit households has declined over the past decade, with an average 2.6 people per household, similar to the country as a whole.

Detroit households with children now make up 26 percent of the city, down from 34 percent in 2000. The figures take into account other types of households in the city that also saw a decline: non-family households make up about 44 percent and households without children, about 31 percent.

In 2000, there were 115,000 families with children living in Detroit; in 2015 there were 65,000 families with children, said Edward Lynch, a planner for Detroit Future City.

Click here to read the full article.

In the Media

Local report details Detroit’s population trends, jobs, housing stock

Robin Runyan, from Curbed Detroit, highlights data in Detroit Future City’s 139 Square Miles report to help residents and stakeholders understand where Detroit has been and where Detroit might be headed.

Local report details Detroit’s population trends, jobs, housing stock
Curbed Detroit
By Robin Runyan
August 23, 2017
LINK


A new report by Detroit Future City called 139 Square Miles, funded through the Knight Foundation, compiles a slew of Detroit data points to help understand where Detroit has been and where we might be headed. The report has data in four areas: population, economy, people, and place. This includes population trends in terms of age and race, where jobs are located and how much they pay, how people get to work, and how housing stock has changed.

Overall, the report shows that Detroit is finally moving toward growth for the first time in 60 years. Although the population itself hasn’t grown yet, it is stabilizing after decades of decline. In this graphic, we can see where housing and population is stabilizing in the city. The darker the blue, the greater the growth.

Click here to read the full article.

In the Media

These Detroit Commuting Numbers Show Stark Inequality

Oscar Perry Abello, from Next City, focuses on statistics about Detroit’s residents, population and economy, using data from Detroit Future City’s 139 Square Miles report.

These Detroit Commuting Numbers Show Stark Inequality
Next City
By: Oscar Perry Abello
August 22, 2017
LINK


When nearly 77 percent of your city’s business owners aren’t able to grow enough to have even one employee (besides the owner), it shouldn’t be too surprising that 40 percent of your population lives below the federal poverty line of $24,339 for a family of four, including 57 percent of the children in your city.

That’s part of the challenge facing Detroit, laid out in a new report, “139 Square Miles,” from the nonprofit Detroit Future City. The report claims to be the first, comprehensive, citywide, data-driven study on the state of Detroit “without analysis or critique.” It compiles quantitative and spatial data from a variety of sources, including the U.S. Census Bureau’s Survey of Business Owners, which is conducted every five years.

Based on Census Bureau data, the report notes that just 2 percent of black-owned businesses have at least one employee besides the owner, compared to 39 percent of white-owned Detroit businesses with at least one employee besides the owner. The same Census Bureau data shows that black entrepreneurs account for 77 percent of all Detroit business owners.

Click here to read the full article.

Blog

DFC is Seeking Community Engagement Program Manager

Detroit Future City (DFC) is seeking a full-time AmeriCorps member to serve as a Community Engagement Program Manager. The member will be responsible for engaging new residents and further engaging existing volunteers in implementing best practices for vacant lot use. Ideally, the candidate will begin service on October 16, 2017 and serve a minimum of 1700 hours though the end of his/her 10-month term.

To apply, email your cover letter and resume to Shari Williams at swilliams@detroitfuturecity.com

Click here for more information about this position.

In the Media

Report: Despite Detroit’s turnaround, opportunity remains out of reach for man

Violet Ikonomova, from Detroit Metro Times, focuses on statistics that showcase Detroit’s economy, and highlights the city’s job opportunities, physical places and transportation, using data from Detroit Future City’s 139 Square Miles report.

Report: Despite Detroit’s turnaround, opportunity remains out of reach for many
Detroit Metro Times
By: Violet Ikonomova
August 21, 2017
LINK


With Detroit in the midst of an economic turnaround after decades of decline, there’s a new set of data out confirming what the naked eye can plainly see: many longtime residents — namely, the minorities who make up 90 percent of the city — are being left out of the nascent growth, and economic disparities, in some cases, are widening.

The “139 Square Miles” report by the non-profit Detroit Future City — known for the 50-year plan for Detroit it released five years ago — gives a comprehensive look at the state of the city using data from the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey and other sources. And while a press release sent out with the report aimed to put a sunny face on things by first giving the good news (tens of thousands of jobs have been added, some neighborhoods are stabilizing, and a decades-long population decline is slowing), then the bad (the unemployment rate is 150 percent higher for African-American residents, a third of residents live off less than $15,000 per year), juxtaposing the data lays bare a gap in the areas of education, job opportunity, and economic advancement.

Click here to read the full article.

In the Media

Detroit Future City introduces ‘139 Square Miles’ in-depth data report on the City

Roz Edward, from the Michigan Chronicle, highlights the impartial analysis of Detroit Future City’s 139 Square Miles report, which aims to present Detroiters with objective facts in a manner that is understandable and accessible.

Detroit Future City introduces ‘139 Square Miles’ in-depth data report on the City
Michigan Chronicle
By: Roz Edward
August 21, 2017
LINK


Detroit Future City (DFC) is proud to introduce 139 Square Miles. This report is the first comprehensive, citywide, data-driven report that our organization has produced for Detroit since 2012, when we released the Detroit Future City Strategic Framework, the 50-year shared vision for the city’s future. This report shows that for the first time in 60 years, Detroit is moving toward population growth, with the economy on the rise and neighborhoods beginning to stabilize.

The 139 Square Miles report uses the most recent available data without analysis or critique. In developing 139 Square Miles, it was Detroit Future City’s aim to present Detroiters with objective facts in a manner that is understandable and accessible. This report is for Detroiters, and it is our hope that 139 Square Miles is shared, used and referenced globally, so that all who are dedicated to Detroit’s stabilization and revitalization can work from an authoritative set of data. This report focuses on four key areas: Population, People, Economy and Place.

Click here to read the full article.