Press Release

DFC Statement: Detroit Blight Removal Task Force Plan

The Detroit Future City Implementation Office is thrilled that the Detroit Blight Removal Task Force has reached this critical  milestone in the fight against blight.

We were especially pleased that the Task Force used the several components of the DFC Strategic Framework to inform their decision making; and, that one of our signature pilot projects, partial deconstruction, was included in the report’s recommendations.

Vacant and blighted structures have been an epidemic that for decades has deteriorated the core of Detroit, its neighborhoods, and the quality of life of residents.  DFC is eager to continue working collaboratively with the Task Force to help move this process forward to catalyze the transformation of Detroit.

Kenneth Cockrel, Jr.
Executive Director
Detroit Future City

In the Media

Denby High pushes students to tie their futures to Detroit’s

In a presentation to strangers and friends, Kyra Portis is at once calm and emotional. This is her capstone project at Denby High School, a labor that has been more blood and sweat than love, at least until now.

“I was born in a car on the way to the hospital,” she says. Her older brother, an infant, was stricken with a brain tumor. Her mother had six more children after her. Methodically, Kyra identifies Detroit’s challenges (low income, low literacy rate, crime, the litany of unpleasant facts) and personal challenges she has faced in her 18 years.

Since early winter, all 200 seniors at Denby, an Education Achievement Authority school, have been linking their lives to the city of Detroit’s future. The project is the outgrowth of a collaboration between the high school and Detroit Future City, the nonprofit city planning organization led by former Councilman Kenneth Cockrel Jr.
Seniors are expected to “defend” their research and their right to graduate — and for most of these students, that means unfolding the personal challenges in their lives and linking their futures to that of the challenged city around them.

Denby High pushes students to tie their futures to Detroit’s
Laura Berman, May 15, 2014, Detroit News 

Blog

Connecting Detroiters to Opportunity Through Transit Innovation

Due to its long-standing fiscal challenges, Detroit has broadly underinvested in its transportation system as well as its supporting technology infrastructure, putting the overall system at a tipping point with regard to its future direction. The current system is oversized, inefficient, and underperforming, with too many Detroit residents, especially the estimated 20% of the city without access to an automobile, suffering from inadequate access to jobs, health care, school, and daily goods and services. As Detroit moves beyond bankruptcy and focuses resources on addressing its significant transportation challenges, the city has the opportunity to test and pioneer innovative approaches to mobility.

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Press Release

Connecting Detroiters to Opportunity Through Transit Innovation

Due to its long-standing fiscal challenges, Detroit has broadly underinvested in its transportation system as well as its supporting technology infrastructure, putting the overall system at a tipping point with regard to its future direction. The current system is oversized, inefficient, and underperforming, with too many Detroit residents, especially the estimated 20% of the city without access to an automobile, suffering from inadequate access to jobs, health care, school, and daily goods and services. As Detroit moves beyond bankruptcy and focuses resources on addressing its significant transportation challenges, the city has the opportunity to test and pioneer innovative approaches to mobility.

READ MORE →

In the Media

Dan Kinead, Director of Detroit Future City, profiled

If you’ve read much about Detroit in the news lately, it hasn’t been good. Facing $18 billion in debt, Detroit declared Chapter 9 bankruptcy last July, becoming the largest U.S. city ever to do so. Its population, having dwindled from a 1950s peak of 1.86 million, is now just 700,000. Roughly half of Detroit’s residents aged 25-64 are unemployed. Its violent crime rate is one of the worst in the nation. Approximately 20 square miles of land within the city — roughly the size of Manhattan — sit empty, where abandoned and blighted buildings have been leveled. An estimated 80,000 abandoned buildings remain in pockets scattered across the city’s 138 square miles.

UK alumnus designs Detroit’s future
May 8th 2014, The Lane Report – reprinted from Kentucky Alumnni magazine’s spring 2014 issue.

E-Newsletter

May 2014: E-Newsletter Detroit Future City Economic Development Priority to Employ More Detroiters

Detroit Future City (DFC) Implementation Office’s economic growth priority is to employ more Detroiters. It is fundamental to achieve a sustainable future and an improved quality of life in Detroit. While the DFC Implementation Office does not directly create jobs, it works collaboratively with an array of partners to inform decision-making, provide crucial tools, and identify new ways to strengthen the city’s overall business environment.

Background

While Detroit has been globally recognized for its economic decline and depopulation over the last half of the 20th century, it is becoming better known for the remarkable economic resurgence that’s been generating since the recession of 2008. Detroit’s economy is being driven by entrepreneurialism and innovation with a growing presence of smaller scale enterprises. This reveals a transformational city that is rapidly leveraging its entrepreneurial spirit, anchor institutions, and industrial heritage to foster opportunities for new industries to develop and prosper.

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